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Top Five Things To Do In Papua New Guinea

17/05/2016
There are plenty of exciting engineering projects either currently underway or on the horizon in Papua New Guinea (PNG). If you’re a contractor that is likely to find yourself working in the country in the near future, then read on to find out what you can do to fill your leisure time!

The country is a true paradise for adventurers, trekkers, divers and nature lovers of all kinds, to say nothing of the fascinating local culture. So where should you start?

Cultural Festivals

PNG hosts an array of festivals celebrating the rich national culture, and these can be a fantastic way to get to know the vibrant history of your new surroundings.



The Goroka Show takes place in the Goroka Province in PNG’s Eastern Highlands. 2016 marks the show’s 60th anniversary, so it is sure to be a more-than-usually spectacular display of traditional songs, dances and costumes. The Mount Hagen Cultural Show, in the Western Highlands, takes place on the third weekend of August, and is one of the largest singsings (tribal gatherings) in PNG. Finally, if you’re based with Fircroft in PNG’s capital city of Port Moresby, you’ll also be interested in the Hiri Moale Festival which takes place in the capital around Independence Day (16th September) and features dramatic canoe races to celebrate PNG’s history of pacific travel and trade.

Diving

PNG is a world-renowned diving location featuring exotic marine life and beautiful coral reefs. Many top diving locations have very deep water very near the shore due to sheer reef walls, making excellent diving very accessible. There are also many WWII wrecks, often remarkably well-preserved, adding interest for even the most experienced divers. Top diving spots include the deep fjords of Tufi and the extraordinary marine life of Milne Bay.



Port Moresby Nature Park

A combined botanical and zoological park, Port Moresby Nature Park is a showcase for PNG’s remarkable array of plant and animal life. The islands are renowned for their biodiversity, and the park is the only place in the world home to all three species of cassowary – a large, flightless bird that can grow to around 6 feet tall and run at up to 30mph. Although cassowaries mainly eat fruit they also have a fearsome reputation due to their large, dagger-like middle toes which they use for self-defence. The park also features some stunning plant life including over 11,000 orchids!

The Kokoda Trail

Not for the fainthearted, the Kokoda Trail is a 96km track which links the north and south coasts of PNG. It is rich in modern history, taking trekkers past the sites of bloody battles between the Japanese and Australian armies during the early stages of WWII. The beautiful rainforests and steep mountains throughout the trek make for an unforgettable experience, and local tour companies can arrange your trek to be broken into stages for trekkers of different fitness levels!

National Museum and Art Gallery



If you’re in need of a more restful activity after all that adventure, then consider a trip to PNG’s National Museum and Art Gallery in Port Moresby. The museum features exhibitions on PNG’s early inhabitants, who arrived around 50,000 years ago, as well as the Independence Gallery which celebrates PNG independence with a display of traditional artefacts from fishing equipment to musical instruments. The modern history wing explores PNG’s role in WWII with a wide variety of military artefacts, while the contemporary art section charts the growth of PNG’s contemporary art scene since the 1960s.

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